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Here you will find articles and information about Bobo Technologies, the NEC and the Electrical Industry in general.

New Examination and Reporting Requirements for Electrical and Plumbing Apprentices

New Examination and Reporting Requirements for Electrical and Plumbing Apprentices

On July 7, 2020, Governor Jared Polis signed SB20-120 Apprentice Examinations and Professional Licenses. The new law, which took effect on September 14, 2020, requires electrical apprentices and plumbing apprentices to take a license examination, if they have been registered for at least six years with either the State Electrical Board or the State Plumbing Board. Electrical apprentices must take the exam every three years. Plumber apprentices must take the exam every two years. If any apprentice fails to pass the license examination in two consecutive periods, the qualified apprentice may request an exemption. 

The law requires employers to remove individuals no longer employed as apprentices from the apprenticeship program and to notify the appropriate board. It also requires a registered plumbing or electrical contractor, apprenticeship programs registered with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration and a state apprenticeship council recognized by the U.S. Department of Labor that employs apprentices to report the number of practical training and classroom hours of each apprentice, as well as the name and contact information of each apprentice, to the respective board. 

In addition, DORA and the Department of Labor and Employment, in consultation with the State Electrical Board and the State Plumbing Board, must conduct research to determine what barriers exist in the preparation and taking of the licensing examinations for apprentices for whom English is a second language and provide any findings to the General Assembly by January 1, 2021.

Special Notice to Electrical and Plumbing Apprentices

As mentioned above, the new law requires electrical and plumbing apprentices to take a licensure examination if the apprentice has been registered with DORA for at least six years. Below are the timeframes for apprentices to start taking the licensure examinations:

Electrical Apprentices – Beginning January 1, 2021, electrical apprentices who have been registered for at least six years must take the Journeyman Electrician’s examination at least once within each three-year renewal period for electrician licensees. Specifically, each electrical apprentice must test once within each of the following timeframes and continue to test during each future three-year licensing renewal cycle: January 1, 2021 to September 30, 2024 and October 1, 2024 to September 30, 2027.

Colorado Approved – 24 Hours of Continuing Education

Bobo Technologies offers three, 8-hour, continuing education courses that are approved by the state of Colorado for your electrical license renewal this year.  They are:

    • 2017 NEC Wiring Methods (8hrs)
    • 2017 NEC Electrical Theory (8hrs)
    • 2017 NEC Changes and Grounding and Bonding (8hrs)

These courses apply to the renewal of Residential Wireman, Journeyman, and Master Electrician licenses.

Approved 2017 NEC courses will be accepted by Colorado through the license renewal period which is July 1, 2020 through September 30, 2020. 

Our courses are available in a classroom setting or online.  The cost per 8-hour course in the classroom is $125.  The cost for online courses is $79 / 8 hours, $139 / 16 hours or $199 for all 24 hours. 

General information: Continuing education hours must be in the core competency areas of Wiring Methods, Electrical Theory and Calcs, Grounding and Bonding, and Code Changes, and pre-approved by the state of Colorado; which Bobo Technologies’ are.  The state has mandated that each licensed electrician take a minimum of 4 hours of Code Changes, again, the NEC 2017 is accepted for Code Changes.  The remaining 20 hours are up to the discretion of the electrical license holder.

Now is the time to schedule your required electrical continuing education classes, especially if you prefer a classroom setting, since space is limited.

GFCI Protection for Personnel for Lighting Outlets in Crawl Spaces

210.8(E) Crawl Space Lighting Outlets.  GFCI protection shall be provided for lighting outlets not exceeding 120 volts installed in crawl spaces.

Comment:  GFCI protection for lighting outlets not exceeding 120 volts is now required where lighting outlets are located in crawl spaces, at or below grade level, of dwelling units or non-dwelling units.  At least one lighting outlet containing a switch or controlled by a wall switch shall be installed where a crawl space is used for storage or it contains equipment requiring servicing. (210.70(C))

GFCI Protection for Personnel in Non-Dwelling Unit Unfinished Basements

210.8(B) Other Than Dwelling Units.  All single-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less and three-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 100 amperes or less installed in the following locations shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

(10) Unfinished portions or areas of the basement not intended as habitable rooms

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Expansion of GFCI Protection for Personnel in Other Than Dwelling Units

210.8(B) Other Than Dwelling Units.  All single-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less and three-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 100 amperes or less installed in the following locations shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

Comment:  The 2014 NEC only required GFCI protection for personnel for 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles located in areas where GFCI protection was required.

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Shortest Path Method of Measurement for GFCI Protection at Sinks

210.8 Informational Note No. 2.  For the purposes of this section, when determining distance from receptacles the distance shall be measured as the shortest path the cord of an appliance connected to the receptacle would follow without piercing a floor, wall, ceiling, or fixed barrier, or passing through a door, doorway, or window.

210.8(A)(7).  Sinks – where receptacles are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft.) from the top inside edge of the bowl.

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Shortest Path Method of Measurement for GFCI Protection of Receptacles

210.8 Informational Note No. 2.  For the purposes of this section, when determining distance from receptacles the distance shall be measured as the shortest path the cord of an appliance connected to the receptacle would follow without piercing a floor, wall, ceiling, or fixed barrier, or passing through a door, doorway, or window.

Comment:  A new Informational Note No. 2 now provides clarification on the measurement technique to be utilized when measuring receptacles requiring GFCI protection.

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Identification of Ungrounded Conductors for Existing Installations where a Different Voltage System is Added

210.5(C)(1), Exception.  In existing installations where a voltage system(s) already exists and a different voltage system is being added, it shall be permissible to mark only the new system voltage.  Existing unidentified systems shall not be required to be identified at each termination, connection, and splice point in compliance with 210.5(C)(1)(a) and (b).  Labeling shall be required at each voltage system distribution equipment to identify that only one voltage system has been marked for a new system(s).  The new system label(s) shall include the words “other unidentified systems exist on the premises.”

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Use of Tightening Torque Tools where instructions are Provided by Manufacturer

110.14(D) Installation.  Where a tightening torque is indicated as a numeric value on equipment or in installation instructions provided by the manufacturer, a calibrated torque tool shall be used to achieve the indicated torque value, unless the equipment manufacturer has provided installation instructions for an alternative method of achieving the required torque.

Comment:  Most electricians are familiar with the old adage “hand tight plus a quarter turn”,

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Limited Access to Working Space About Electrical Equipment

110.26(A)(4) Limited Access.  Where equipment operating at 1000 volts, nominal, or less to ground and likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized is required by installation instructions or function to be located in a space with limited access, all of the following shall apply:

(a) Where equipment is installed above a lay-in ceiling, there shall be an opening not smaller than 559 mm x 559 mm (22 in. x 22 in.), or in a crawl space, there shall be an accessible opening not smaller than 559 mm x 762 mm (22 in. x 30 in.).

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